You say goodbye, and I say hello… (Giveaway!)


As a few of you may have already noticed, I am in the process of switching this site over to my own self-hosted one (which is already up and running, but still under minor construction!).

To celebrate this change as well as thank you all for sticking with my through this blogging journey for so long, I’ve set up a giveaway! You can enter to win signed copies of Since You’ve Been Gone by Morgan Matson (as well as a signed Unexpected Everything pouch) and The Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater.

You must be following me on the new site to be entered, following me on this site will not count towards the giveaway and your entries will be disqualified, so make sure to head over there and check it out!

Thanks everyone!



Review: Captive Prince by C.S. Pacat

Captive Prince by C.S. Pacat
Series: Captive Prince #1
Published by Berkley on April 7, 2015
Genres: Fantasy, Romance, LGTBQ, Historical
Pages: 270 : Paperback edition
Source: Borrowed from my local library
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Damen is a warrior hero to his people, and the rightful heir to the throne of Akielos. But when his half brother seizes power, Damen is captured, stripped of his identity, and sent to serve the prince of an enemy nation as a pleasure slave.

Beautiful, manipulative, and deadly, his new master, Prince Laurent, epitomizes the worst of the court at Vere. But in the lethal political web of the Veretian court, nothing is as it seems, and when Damen finds himself caught up in a play for the throne, he must work together with Laurent to survive and save his country.

For Damen, there is just one rule: never, ever reveal his true identity. Because the one man Damen needs is the one man who has more reason to hate him than anyone else…

I’ve come to the realization recently that I have series phobia. On top of that I’ve been adverse to hype ever since I was extremely let down by Looking for Alaska and The Hunger Games in high school. So, when this slowly started filtering onto my radar the past couple months on Tumblr, I questioned if it was really THAT good.

And IT IS. Whatever hype you’ve heard about it? It’s true. I flew through this (total) in probably just a few hours, and only stopped reading because school, work, and sleep got in the way. I haven’t been this sucked into a book in such a long time and it felt great.


A pretty accurate representation of how I felt upon finishing Captive Prince.

There’s so many compelling things going on within these first 270 pages (I can’t WAIT to get my hands on the rest of the series), but above all you’ll find political strife, gay/lesbian/bisexual relationships, a historical aspect that lends a hand to some really excellent fanart, and a writing style that sort of slaps you in the face in its simplicity, yet complexity.

There were a few times I would put this down and just kind of stare into space like “what the hell did I just read? How does C.S. Pascat do that with her words?” And the rest of the time I was just left gaping at the page, shocked that anything could be that good.

Long story short? Buy this series right now. Buy the whole thing. I’m serious, you’re not going to want to make the mistake I did of not having the sequel right next to you to pick up immediately. Need more convincing? Check out my status updates on Goodreads while I was reading this:

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ARC/Graphic Novel Review: Golem by Lorenzo Ceccotti

Golem by Lorenzo Ceccotti
Series: N/A
Published by Roca Editorial on August 31, 2016
Genres: Graphic Novel, Science Fiction
Pages: 280 : Paperback edition
Source: A copy was provided by the publisher (via NetGalley) in exchange for an honest review
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Set in post-Eurozone Italy, entrenched in a bizarre form of hyper-capitalism, GOLEM follows a young boy kidnapped during a political protest gone sour, who learns that he has the power to not only change the city, but reality itself. This wildly imaginative political-sci-fi graphic novel is a visual tour de force, created by contemporary design icon Lorenzo Ceccotti.

Admittedly, I flew through the first 200 pages of this in a single day and after finishing up the last 80 I sort of regretted it because it flew by almost too fast and then the ending felt so rushed. The final battle was only a couple pages and I was left wanting more explanations for what had happened and what was going to happen after the book ended.

Additionally, I don’t think I fully understood everything that was happening in the world because there wasn’t a ton of background given to us. I do think there is a good story here, but it just seems like something that we’ve seen so many times again and again.

What really saved this for me and what caused me to give it more than just two stars was the art work. It’s really phenomenal and compelling to look at. Story aside, it’s a beautiful piece of work because of the vibrant colors that clash with the dark imagery. Really exceptional.

I would say give this a try if you’re having a thirst for some dystopian graphic novels, but don’t spend a lot of money in doing so.

Graphic Novel Review: Paper Girls by Brian K. Vaughan

Paper Girls by Brian K. Vaughan, Cliff Chiang (illustrator), Matthew Wilson (illustrator)
Series: Paper Girls #1-5
Published by Image Comics on April 5, 2016
Genres: Young Adult, Science Fiction, Comics
Pages: 144 : e-book edition
Source: Received a review copy from the publisher in exchange for an honest review (via NetGalley)
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In the early hours after Halloween of 1988, four 12-year-old newspaper delivery girls uncover the most important story of all time. Suburban drama and otherworldly mysteries collide in this smash-hit series about nostalgia, first jobs, and the last days of childhood.

My first thought when I finished reading this was “WOAH. That went a little fast.” And this can be seen as both a good and a bad thing. I like that the story didn’t drag out and moved along, but it also moved at a pace that was just a bit too fast for me. I wanted it to slow down and show me more of what was going on.

That being said, I think it was an okay set up for what seems like is going to be a really cool series. I anticipate liking the next compilation of variants to be better since they’ll be able to dive more into the nitty gritty of what is going on in and have more world/character building.

I’ll admit, I do have a soft spot for Brian K. Vaughan’s works (especially Saga) so that was what originally pulled me in to this series, but the artwork is also incredible and very 80’s. Radical. I mean look at that cover! Those girls look awesome!

Speaking of the girls, they were all a tad underdeveloped, but again, I think with time they’ll be able to show how awesome they are in their own way. Not to mention that each of them seem to have their own skill set and capabilities/knowledge that disallows them from falling into the tropes of so many comic girls I see. They’re not simpering ladies waiting for someone to save them. They take charge and do what they can (all at 12 years old!).

Overall, I gave it a three out of five stars. The pacing and lack of development in some areas bothered me, but the art and dialogue made up for that. I’m excited to read the next one!

ARC Review: The Star-Touched Queen by Roshani Chokshi

The Star-Touched Queen by Roshani Chokshi
Series: N/A
Published by St. Martin’s Griffin on April 26, 2016
Genres: Young Adult, Fantasy, Mythology, Romance
Pages: 352 : e-ARC edition
Source: Received an ARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest review (via NetGalley)
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Cursed with a horoscope that promises a marriage of Death and Destruction, sixteen-year-old Maya has only earned the scorn and fear of her father’s kingdom. Content to follow more scholarly pursuits, her world is upheaved when her father, the Raja, arranges a wedding of political convenience to quell outside rebellions. But when her wedding takes a fatal turn, Maya becomes the queen of Akaran and wife of Amar. Yet neither roles are what she expected. As Akaran’s queen, she finds her voice and power. As Amar’s wife, she finds friendship and warmth.

But Akaran has its own secrets – thousands of locked doors, gardens of glass, and a tree that bears memories instead of fruit. Beneath Akaran’s magic, Maya begins to suspect her life is in danger. When she ignores Amar’s plea for patience, her discoveries put more than new love at risk – it threatens the balance of all realms, human and Otherworldly.

Now, Maya must confront a secret that spans reincarnated lives and fight her way through the dangerous underbelly of the Otherworld if she wants to protect the people she loves.

THE STAR TOUCHED QUEEN is a lush, beautifully written and vividly imagined fantasy inspired by Indian mythology.

When I read this I felt like I was being transported to another world. Which honestly hasn’t happened too often, or even recently, so it was a refreshing read over all. Chokshi was able to weave together a story as enthralling as it was beautiful. Steeped in mythological references and deeply sated in Indian culture, I loved finally having a protagonist who was a really awesome woman of color and a story that felt true to its roots.

Maya, our main character seemed so real to me. She makes mistakes and see’s the error of h9781250085474_il_2_0c898er ways and isn’t this perfect cookie cutter type character where everything works out perfectly. She experiences joy, but there is also loss in her life and this helps her grows and defines her as a person and a ruler.

Amar *fans self* wow. Amar was interesting and intriguing, always being shown as this mysterious figure. By the end of the novel though I wish we could have gotten to know him a little better because I didn’t 100% connect with him (and the relationship felt underdeveloped).

I ultimately gave this 4 out of 5 stars because I think the writing needed a smidge of refinement since at times I wanted to be shown not told, but there are some really beautiful passages and imagery here that will make this one really memorable for me. I highly recommend pre-ordering this or picking it up once it comes out in a few weeks!

Graphic Novel Review: Baby’s in Black by Arne Bellstorf


Baby’s in Black by Arne Bellstorf
Series: N/A
Published by First Second on October 1, 2010
Genres: Graphic Novel, Music, Nonfiction
Pages: 208 : Hardcover edition
Source: Checked out from my local library
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A fascinating, exhilarating portrait of the Beatles in their early years.

Meet the Beatles . . . right at the beginning of their careers. This gorgeous, high-energy graphic novel is an intimate peek into the early years of the world’s greatest rock band.

The heart of Baby’s In Black is a love story. The “fifth Beatle,” Stuart Sutcliffe, falls in love with the beautiful Astrid Kirchherr when she recruits the Beatles for a sensational (and famous) photography session during their time in Hamburg. When the band returns to the UK, Sutcliffe quits, becomes engaged to Kirchherr, and stays in Hamburg. A year later, his meteoric career as a modern artist is cut short when he dies unexpectedly.

The book ends as it begins, with Astrid, alone and adrift; but with a note of hope: her life is incomparably richer and more directed thanks to her friendship with the Beatles and her love affair with Sutcliffe. This tender story is rendered in lush, romantic black-and-white artwork.

Baby’s In Black is based on a true story.

If you follow me on Tumblr or Twitter, or have had the misfortune of interacting with me on any social capacity, then you know I have an obsession with this little band called The Beatles (sorry by the way to all the people I’ve tried to push their music on).

Anyways, when I found this little graphic novel about Astrid Kirchherr and Stuart Sutcliffe (he was the original Beatles bass player and Astrid was his fiancee/the one who inspired a lot of the Beatles’ early looks and a kick ass photographer) and nearly screamed. This graphic novel felt like a split between Persepolis and Maus, though obviously with a much less serious topic.

I really enjoy these types of graphic novels where the art is more sketch based with some ink in there for contrast/depth. They’re easy to read and especially for an era like this where all the photographs were in black and white it read as if I were diving into a photo from that time period and taking a peek at their lives.

The real question here is: should you read this if you’re not a Beatle fan? Maybe. If you’re a die-hard, overly obsessed Apple scruff like me, then absolutely pick this up. I finished it in about half an hour and was laughing and saying “aww” through the whole thing. Even if you’re a casual fan it’s a good read about the early “Teddy Boy” years when Ringo wasn’t even in the band and there were 5 “Silver Beetles”. But if you’re not a huge fan (what is wrong with you) then I’d say perhaps give this one a pass.

You know, despite having no artistic or musical inclinations, I often want to chop off all my hair like Astrid and wear dark eyeliner, and go to little clubs to listen to rock and roll bands. Sigh, guess that’s a by product of me not being born in the right time period. Darn it.


ARC Review: Dreamology by Lucy Keating

Dreamology by Lucy Keating
Series: N/A
Published by HarperTeen on April 12, 2016
Genres: Young Adult, Contemporary, Romance
Pages: 3336 : ARC edition
Source: Received an ARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest review
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Vibrantly offbeat and utterly original, Lucy Keating’s debut novel combines the unconventional romance of Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind with the sweetness and heart of Jenny Han.

For as long as Alice can remember, she has dreamed of Max. Together, they have traveled the world and fallen deliriously, hopelessly in love. Max is the boy of her dreams—and only her dreams. Because he doesn’t exist.

But when Alice walks into class on her first day at a new school, there he is. Real Max is nothing like Dream Max. He’s stubborn and complicated. And he has a whole life Alice isn’t a part of. Getting to know each other in reality isn’t as perfect as Alice always hoped.

Alarmingly, when their dreams start to bleed into their waking hours, the pair realize that they might have to put an end to a lifetime of dreaming about each other. But when you fall in love in your dreams, can reality ever be enough?

When this first popped up on my doorstep from HarperTeen, I have to admit I hadn’t heard of it but was very intrigued by the cover, the title, the synopsis…pretty much everything. Add to that that I had been in a bit (ie. a 2 month long) reading slump, this was just the book I needed to kick my reading funk all while being a super adorable and enjoyable read!

This is the type of book that eating a marshmallow while listening to soothing music on a rainy day feels like. In other words, it’s sweet, it stops and makes you think about your life, but it also has that hint of sadness to it (just a hint. A splash. Like adding cinnamon to hot chocolate).

The entire premise of this story is just so refreshing and original. I find dreams to be very special so to have a story written about them in such an interesting way made for a really interesting book. Especially since the dreams and psychology of it all was explained here and there but not in a way that detracted from the story (I mean, hello, Mr. Levy sounds awesome and I want to sign up for his psych class immediately).

I also really enjoyed how the dreams were described because I fell into the pages and wanted to be there with Max and Alice the entire time. And the rest of the characters were awesome as well! So original and life-like.

So, I think this may go down as one of my top books of the year and hope to see a lot more from Lucy Keating in the future!

Bonus: Totally give this song a listen while reading Dreamology. I had it on loop almost the entire time and it just worked so well with the entire book. Continue reading